iterable / iterable-play-utils

Iterable's Utilities for Play Framework for Scala

GitHub

iterable-play-utils

Travis CI Maven

A collection of utilites used by Iterable in Scala Play! projects.

Adding to your SBT project

The latest version supports Play 2.6.x. To include it in your dependencies:

libraryDependencies += "com.iterable" %% "iterableplayutils" % "2.0.0"

All versions can be found on maven central.

Version Scala version Play! version
3.0.0 2.12.x/2.11.x 2.7.x
2.0.0 2.12.x/2.11.x 2.6.x
1.1.1 2.11.x 2.5.x
1.1.0 2.11.x 2.4.x
1.0.1 2.10.x 2.2.x

Automatic Case Class Mappings (via runtime reflection)

See com.iterable.play.utils.CaseClassMapping. Uses runtime reflection to generate form mappings for case classes without all the manual typing.

Once again, this uses runtime reflection, not compile-time macros.

Please note that this suffers from thread safety issues in Scala 2.10, which is why the build includes parallelExecution in Test := false

See the relevant document from Scala

Suppose you have the following case class:

case class Foo(
  bar: String,
  baz: Option[Long]
)

In order to use forms/mappings, you would normally do:

val fooForm = Form(
  mapping(
    "bar" -> text,
    "baz" -> optional(longNumber)
  )(Foo.apply)(Foo.unapply)
)

This works fine, but it can get very cumbersome if your case classes take many parameters. It's also difficult to keep track of things if you rename the various arguments. CaseClassMapping seeks to take care of this by automatically generating a Mapping[T] for your case class T. In order to use it, any non-standard types that your case class uses must expose an implicit Mapping[T] of that type in their companion object; additionally, that mapping must be either a nullary def or a val.

For example, to create a form for our example case class Foo, you can do:

val fooForm = Form(CaseClassMapping.mapping[Foo])

...and that's it!

More often we use it like this:

object Foo {
  implicit val mapping = CaseClassMapping.mapping[Foo]
}

// somewhere later where we need a Form[Foo]
val fooForm = Form(implicitly[Mapping[Foo]])

If you want to add constraints to your mapping, you can still do so; for example, if we want to make sure that Foo.bar is at least 5 characters long:

object Foo {
  implicit val mappingWithConstraint = CaseClassMapping.mapping[Foo].verifying {
    Constraint[Foo]("Foo.bar") { foo =>
      Constraints.minLength(5)(foo.bar)
    }
  }
}

Another use case for this is for posting form data via Play's WS. Normally, you would do something like this:

WS.url("https://some.api.expecting.form.encoded.data").post(
    Map(
        "name" -> Seq("ilya"),
        "age" -> Seq(9001.toString),
        "email" -> Seq("ilya at iterable dot com"),
        "favoriteBands" -> Seq("Judas Priest", "Accept")
    )
)

That doesn't look particularly nice... so you can use UnbindableToWsRequest:

case class User(name: String, age: Int, email: String, favoriteBands: Seq[String]) extends UnbindableToWsRequest[User]
object User {
    implicit val mapping = CaseClassMapping.mapping[User]
}

val user = User(name = "ilya", age = 9001, email = "ilya at iterable dot com", favoriteBands = Seq("Judas Priest", "Accept"))
WS.url("some url").post(user.unbindToWsRequest)

Note that there is one caveat with this; Seq types. Using the previous example, the unbound data will look like this:

Map(
    "name" -> Seq("ilya"),
    "age" -> Seq(9001.toString),
    "email" -> Seq("ilya at iterable dot com"),
    "favoriteBands[0]" -> Seq("Judas Priest"),
    "favoriteBands[1]" -> Seq("Accept")
)

Specifically, note that favoriteBands is unbound as

    "favoriteBands[0]" -> Seq("Judas Priest"),
    "favoriteBands[1]" -> Seq("Accept")

instead of

    "favoriteBands" -> Seq("Judas Priest", "Accept")

See the tests for more sample usage.